Recipes for Food and Nutrition GCSE

I’ve been developing recipes for Food and Nutrition GCSE looking at the skills required to get the higher grades.

What really bothers me is that exam boards want skills related to pastry and sauce making and these all contain lots of FAT!! I am getting fatter doing the testing!

The recipes are logged on my Jenny Ridgwell site and I will be doing a nutritional breakdown and Recipe sheet for each.

Chicken and mushroom pie

Chicken liver pate – increase the iron

Cheese straws 

Couscous with roasted vegetables  

Moussaka

Samosas

Peach tart

Tarte Tatin

Moussaka

Insert Nutrition Program Images into Word

For Food and Nutrition GCSE coursework you need to present your Nutrition Program work as neatly as possible and this pdf show how to insert a Star Profile from Nutrition Program into Word.

I’ve attached a how-to-insert-nutrition-program-images to show step-by-step how to insert the pdf into a Word page.

Your final work could look like this:

star profile Nutrition Program

Insert the image from Nutrition Program into Word

Insert the image from Nutrition Program into Word

Save

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The Eatwell Guide

The Eatwell PlateThe Eatwell Guide shows the different types of foods and drinks we should consume – and in
what proportions – to have a healthy, balanced diet.
The Eatwell Guide shows the proportions of the main food groups that form a healthy,
balanced diet:
• Eat at least 5 portions of a variety of fruit and vegetables every day
• Base meals on potatoes, bread, rice, pasta or other starchy carbohydrates; choosing
wholegrain versions where possible
• Have some dairy or dairy alternatives (such as soya drinks); choosing lower fat and lower
sugar options
• Eat some beans, pulses, fish, eggs, meat and other proteins (including 2 portions of fish
every week, one of which should be oily)
• Choose unsaturated oils and spreads and eat in small amounts
• Drink 6-8 cups/glasses of fluid a day
If consuming foods and drinks high in fat, salt or sugar have these less often and in small
amounts.

Regularly consuming foods and drinks high in sugar increases your risk of obesity and tooth
decay. Ideally, no more than 5% of the energy we consume should come from free sugars*.
Currently, children and adults across the UK are consuming 2-3 times that amount.

Sugary drinks have no place in a child’s daily diet but account for a surprisingly large proportion
of the daily sugar intake of both children and adults. Almost a third of the free sugars consumed
by 11-18 year olds comes from soft drinks. We should aim to swap sugary drinks for water,
lower fat milk or sugar-free drinks including tea and coffee. Be sure to check the label for added
sugar.

8 tips for eating well
1. Base your meals on starchy foods
2. Eat lots of fruit and veg
3. Eat more fish – including a portion of
oily fish each week
4. Cut down on saturated fat and sugar
5. Eat less salt – no more than 6g a day
for adults
6. Get active and be a healthy weight
7. Don’t get thirsty
8. Don’t skip breakfast

Portion sizes

Where do we get our portion sizes from for the Nutrition Program? Well, the government report Food Portion Sizes gives lots of clues, but the best results come from supermarket websites.

food portion sizes

The Government’s Public Health Responsibility Deal calls for reduced portion size as a way to reduce calorific intake.

School Food Plan has excellent charts on portion sizes

School Food Plan portion

 

BUPA has an excellent website with portion sizes for different foods.

Starchy foods

Strachy food portions

 

 

 

Meat, fish and other proteins

Portion sizes

 

 

 

Dairy foods

portion sizes

 

 

 

 

 

The Scottish Government site Hungry for Success shows it in more detail.

Cheese 50 g

Use The Nutrition Program  for portion sizes

Raw meat 80g

Bread 100 grams